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Catherine Luther

Catherine Luther's picture

Information

School of Journalism & Electronic Media
Director
Professor

Before returning to the academic world for her Ph.D., Dr. Luther worked both in the United States and in Japan as a producer of television news. She is now a professor in the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and teaches in the areas of international journalism, media and diversity, communication and information science theories, and research methods.

Dr. Luther has published in such journals as the Journal of Communication, Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, and Journalism History. She has had two books published. One entitled Press Images, National Identity, and Foreign Policy was published by Routledge in 2002. The other published in 2012 by Wiley-Blackwell is entitled Diversity in U.S. Mass Media; the second edition of this book is expected to be published in 2016.

Dr. Luther has received several awards including the 2012 University of Tennessee Notable Woman Award recognizing excellence in administration, research and teaching, the American Press Institute, John Ben Snow Memorial Trust Fellowship Award, the Radio Television News Directors Foundation/Knight Foundation's Educator in the Newsroom Fellowship Award, the International Radio and Television Society Faculty/Industry Award, the University of Tennessee, College of Communication and Information Bud Minkel International/Intercultural Award, and the University of Tennessee, College of Communication and Information Outstanding Faculty Research Award. Dr. Luther was also awarded a Fulbright Research Grant to conduct research in Japan in 2007. She was recently selected as a 2012-2013 Fellow in the SECAC Academic Leadership Development program.

Contact
333 Communications Bldg.
865-974-5118
Research Interests: 
International communication
Press-state relations
Intergroup conflict
Terrorism and the media
Issues involving media and social group representations